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Contemporary Art Conservation Revisited: 20 Years Later

Our training program's 20th anniversary provides us with a wonderful opportunity to pause and reflect on the evolving roles and practices in contemporary art conservation. We would like to invite you to partake in this process and hope for your manifold contributions to create an engaging event for our community. Please find below a call for papers and an invitation for a symposium organized by the Bern University of the Arts.

Contemporary Art Conservation Revisited: 20 Years Later

In 2001, the first students graduated in a new specialty at the Bern University of the Arts’ conservation training program: Conservation of Modern Materials and Media. As a precursor in the field, the specialty’s launch was a response to changing contemporary artists' practices and a commitment to the preservation of artworks outside traditional disciplines, embodying unconventional technologies and materials. The necessity of a different approach to care for and treat these works of art is reflected in its curriculum, incorporating methodologies and techniques from social sciences, revisiting the importance of documentation, and establishing the significance of artistic concepts within a decision-making process.

Looking back at the last 20 years, we see shifts in the field of contemporary art conservation, which compel us to (re)define its role, questioning existing structures and modes of operating: What is a conservator of contemporary art today? What is their skillset, and has it changed over the years? What are the types of roles contemporary art conservators fulfill? How inclusive is this discipline and who has access to it? Did the discipline’s approach or areas of research shift during the years? Which new research topics have emerged? How can an institution benefit from conservators being part of the team and facilitating processes of acquisition, artist engagement, and research? And what, if we look more closely, hinders these developments in our institutions?

This two-day symposium aims to examine and debate these questions, hoping to inspire dialog between stakeholders.

We're looking for a variety of perspectives and positions to reflect on this topic and invite abstracts from conservators, collection managers, curators, educators, registrars and artists. These may include considerations on roles and values, new tools and skills needed, case studies that have brought upon changes in approach, as well as positions examining new areas of research or shifts in education programs, emphasizing different aspects of training.

The symposium will be held virtually on  Jan 27 & 28, 2022.

For more information and registrations visit  https://www.hkb.bfh.ch/conscare

The organizing committee: Dörte Doering, Martina Haidvogl, Martina Pfenninger Lepage

 

Registration INCCA speed mentoring session : https://incca.org/events/incca-speed-mentoring-session

jeudi, 27. janvier 2022 until vendredi, 28. janvier 2022
virtually

CAA 2022 Annual Conference

Formation continue Externe Veranstaltung
Réservé: 0 | Free Seats: 12
Join us for a very exciting panel taking place ONLINE on Thursday, March 3, 4-5:30 pm EST / 11:00pm-00:30am CET at the College Art Association, Chicago! Registration required.
 
How can a work of performance – ephemeral, site- and time-sensitive, possibly tied to the body of the artist – be conserved? This question has long been answered by recourse to documentation and performance "relics," the tangible, exhibitable and, above all, collectible remains of performances. Yet in the past decade, museums have begun to acquire live artworks and restage historical ones, lending urgency to the practical as well as theoretical problems of conserving works of art long considered too ephemeral to be conservable. As contemporary art has grown more demanding, conservation has also grown as a discipline, developing new discourses and practices that both revise and expand the conservator's role. No longer confined behind the scenes, conservators are now routinely asked to consult on acquisitions, direct complex installations, or even creatively partake in the reinstantiation of conceptual and performance works. Conservators accordingly have a new consciousness of their influence on the work of art and thus the course of art history. This panel, which has been organized within a collaborative research initiative Performance: Conservation, Materiality, Knowledge, examines performance as the object of conservation, seeking contributions from scholars, conservators, archivists, and others who address theoretical and practical questions related to the ongoing life of performance works in institutions and beyond, as well as explorations of the conservator's role in bringing liveness into the museum.
 
Presenters Denise Petzold, Maastricht University Megan Metcalf, Lauren Rosati and Limor Tomer, The Metropolitan Museum of Art Paul Couillard, Toronto Performance Art Collective Ian Wallace, Graduate Center, City University of New York
 
Introduction, moderation and chairJules Pelta Feldman, Postdoctoral Fellow, Bern University of the Arts Hanna Barbara Holling, Associate Professor, University College London / Research Professor, Bern University of the Arts
 
ABSTRACTS
 
Denise Petzold: Conservation as transcorporeal labour and play: An ethnographic study on calibrating classical musical works in bodies
 
In the last decades, contemporary art has become increasingly diverse and thus challenging to conservators. In performance art, bodies – human as well as nonhuman ones – have come to play a key role in processes of conservation, for example through practicing, rehearsing, and re-performing artworks. One place in which bodies have been trained for centuries and still are trained to conserve artworks is the music conservatoire. By understanding the conservatoire as a place where musicians become expert maintainers of musical heritage, this paper turns to classical music to explore what insights contemporary art conservators might gain from how musicians learn to perform works. I show how students and teachers – rather than being mere 'transmitters' of artworks – actively engage in a conservation practice in which human bodies and nonhuman instruments intertwine in processes of transcorporeal labour and play. Drawing on a year of ethnographic research (observations and qualitative interviews) of three violoncello classes at the Conservatorium Maastricht, I examine how in bodies and cellos together the ambivalences and boundaries of the works' identities are negotiated. Thereby, musical works become engrained into bodies as sets of individually choreographed, fine-calibrated motions, turning the musicians' bodies and instruments into material archives through which musical memory and history are actualised. From this, I draw conclusions for contemporary art conservation about the role of human and nonhuman bodies in processes of conservation, conservation as a transcorporeal effort, and the idea of who or what a conservator can be.
 
Megan Metcalf, Lauren Rosati, and Limor Tomer: The Future is Now: Digital Archives as Performance Conservation at The Metropolitan Museum of Art
 
Last year, when the majority of live events around the world were put on hold due to the coronavirus, producers adapted quickly to organize performances for virtual spaces. What will be their legacy once this time of crisis is over? This presentation uses examples from the Metropolitan Museum of Art to explore the role of digital documentation in producing performances for virtual audiences and to speculate on what the future holds for preserving these experiences. It argues that, as these performances incorporate distribution and documentation into their conception, they disrupt conventional thinking about conservation that characterizes it as something after or outside the artwork-and places it at the heart of a work's creation. As such, these projects extend ideas about documentation as critical to a performance's ontology, introduced in the performance art of the 1960s and 70s, and give them new expression today in the digital sphere. The demand for virtual events at the Met prompted its curators, artists, and digital producers to experiment with new ways of thinking about "liveness," which has implications for the collection and preservation of time-based media at the Met. This not only pressures the distinction between an artwork and its documentation, the museum and the archive, but also distinctions between curatorial departments, museum protocols, and professional competencies. Finally, lost performances from the Met's history-both recent and in the distant past-provide insights into the stakes of conserving the productions of this unusual time.
 
Paul Couillard: Conserving performance art: The materiality of the gesture
 
Performing arts traditions tend to treat works as texts-scores, scripts, and choreographies-that endure by being reinterpreted by new performers. Visual art traditions seek to preserve objects crafted by their creators. Contemporary performance art practices, however, tend to view the unique temporal, spatial, material and relational conditions of a performance's production as the very "flesh" of the work. Consequently, historical exhibitions of performance art tend to focus on material remains: objects, recordings and other documentation that both come out of and stand in for a body of work. While Jones (1997, 2011), Auslander (2006) and others have argued that such documents are a vital part of performance art practice, and, indeed, are likely to transmit an artist's ideas to a much wider audience than any actual performance, it is little wonder that Phelan (1993) has argued that the ontology of a performance is to be found in its disappearance. Exhibitions of remains often have a feeling of
 
Ian Wallace: An Ecology of Worth: The "Rediscovery" of Charlotte Posenenske, 2007–2019
 
The questions raised by the acquisition and conservation of Charlotte Posenenske's Reliefs, Vierkantrohre (Square Tubes), and Drehflügel (Revolving Vane)- all of which were conceived in the mid-1960s to be sold, in unlimited series, at the cost of their production-lie at the center of a greater shift in museum acquisition policies whereby diverse materials have displaced the concept of an auratic, original object. While many museums have acquired Posenenske's work in the past decade, there is wide variation in the material collected, from sketches and early studies (MoMA, New York) to aged particleboard prototypes (Tate Modern, London) and new refabrications (MMK, Frankfurt). This paper tracks recent curatorial approaches to Posenenske's work through three key exhibitions that established what I call an "ecology of worth" around her work. 2007's Documenta 12 situated her among a coterie of roughly-contemporaneous, international practices and paving the way for its reintroduction to the market. A few years later, a 2010 exhibition at New York's Artists Space invited three contemporary artists to reconfigure Posenenske's sculptures, retooling her emphasis on cooperation for the production of social capital. Most recently, Dia Beacon's 2019 exhibition "Work in Progress" applied new standards of dating to demarcate new categorical hierarchizations within Posenenske's oeuvre and to emphasize her works' historical value. Through analyses of these exhibitions, I argue that the variable treatment of Posenenske's work indicates a conflict between the artist's intention of devaluation, the historical value of the performance "relic," and art's economic value as cultural property.
jeudi, 03. mars 2022 - 11:00 until 12:30
Online

Conserving performance, performing conservation

Call for Papers Externe Veranstaltung
Réservé: 0 | Free Seats: 100

Call for papers: Conserving performance, performing conservation

90-minute session for the Annual Conference of the College Art Association
Date: March 3-5, 2022 (time and date of the panel TBD)
Location: Online
Deadline to submit: September 16

How can a work of performance – ephemeral, site- and time-sensitive, possibly tied to the body of the artist – be conserved? This question has long been answered by recourse to documentation and performance “relics,” the tangible, exhibitable and, above all, collectible remains of performances. Yet in the past decade, museums have begun to acquire live artworks and restage historical ones, lending urgency to the practical as well as theoretical problems of conserving works of art long considered too ephemeral to be conservable.

As contemporary art has grown more demanding, conservation has also grown as a discipline, developing new discourses and practices that both revise and expand the conservator’s role. No longer confined behind the scenes, conservators are now routinely asked to consult on acquisitions, direct complex installations, or even creatively partake in the reinstantiation of conceptual and performance works. Conservators accordingly have a new consciousness of their influence on the work of art and thus the course of art history.

This panel will examine performance as the object of conservation, seeking contributions from scholars, conservators, archivists, curators, artists, and others who address theoretical and practical questions related to the ongoing life of performance works in institutions and beyond, as well as explorations of the conservator’s role in bringing liveness into the museum.

Chairs: Hanna B. Hölling, University College London/Bern University of the Arts and Julia Pelta Feldman, Bern University of the Arts.

 

 

HOW TO SUBMIT

Please submit proposals to organizers Hanna Hölling and Julia Pelta Feldman at Cette adresse e-mail est protégée contre les robots spammeurs. Vous devez activer le JavaScript pour la visualiser. by September 16.

Proposals must include:

1. Completed CAA proposal form: https://caa.confex.com/caa/f/CAA2022CFPProposalForm
2. A shortened CV (2 pages max).

 

 

CAA Key Dates:

  • By September 16, send proposals directly to session Chairs.
  • By September 23, CAA chairs will finalize their sessions, inform participants via email invitation, and add accepted presenters to their session entry. Upon acceptance, presenters *must join and or keep CAA memberships current through March 5* (you may apply with a non-member ID). Only members can be added to a Session.
jeudi, 03. mars 2022 until samedi, 05. mars 2022

SKR/SCR Jahrestagung | congrès annuel | convegno annuale 2022

Komplizierter Kontext – Konservierung unter schwierigen  Bedingungen

In unserem Berufsalltag arbeiten wir regelmässig mit Objekten, die in komplizierten Kontexten zu Hause sind. Die perfekte Lösung für einen nachhaltigen Erhalt ist selten greifbar. Wir – KonservatorInnen-RestauratorInnen, ArchäologInnen, KunsthistorikerInnen, DenkmaplflegerInnen, ArchitektInnen – sind herausgefordert, unter Wahrung der Ansprüche der verschiedenen Interessensvertreter Lösungen, oftmals Kompromisse, zu finden, die dem Erhalt der uns anvertrauten Kulturgüter dienen.
In neun Beiträgen werden wir Lösungsansätze aus verschiedenen Fachbereichen vorstellen.

pdfDownload Programm

 

Un contexte délicat – La conservation dans des  conditions difficiles

Dans notre profession, nous sommes régulièrement confrontés à des objets en situation délicate : il n’existe pas, ou très rarement, de solution toute faite pour les conserver de manière durable. Nous, les conservatrices-restauratrices, conservateurs-restaurateurs, archéologues, historiennes et historiens de l’art, conservatrices et conservateurs de monuments et architectes devons faire appel à notre créativité, souvent trouver un compromis, afin de préserver les biens culturels qui nous sont confiés tout en répondant aux exigences des différentes parties prenantes.
Les neuf conférences sur ce sujet présenteront diverses approches possibles issues de plusieurs domaines spécialisés.

pdfDownload Programme

 

Contesto complesso – conservazione in condizioni difficili

Nella nostra professione lavoriamo regolarmente con oggetti che si trovano in contesti complessi. La soluzione perfetta per una conservazione durevole e sostenibile è raramente a portata di mano. Noi conservatrici-restauratrici e conservatori- restauratori, archeologhe e archeologi, storiche e storici dell’arte, specialiste e specialisti della tutela dei monumenti storici, architette e architetti siamo chiamati a trovare soluzioni per preservare i beni culturali che ci sono stati affidati, spesso in forma di compromesso e nel rispetto delle esigenze dei vari gruppi d’interesse,

pdfDownload Programma

 

vendredi, 25. mars 2022 - 08:30 until 17:00
Landesmuseum Zürich, Auditorium Willy G.S. Hirzel, Museumstrasse 2, 8001 Zürich

CULTURA SUISSE 06. - 8. April 2022

 Cultura April

 

Fachmesse für Museen, Denkmalpflege und Kulturgüter
Vom 6. - 8. April 2022 zum dritten Mal in der BERNEXPO.

 

DIE CULTURA SUISSE IST:

  • die zum 3. Mal stattfindende, nationale Fach- messe für Museen, Museumstechnik, Denkmal pflege, Handwerk und Restaurierung sowie Kulturgutbewahrung in der Schweiz und den angrenzenden Ländern.
  • Zur letzten Ausgabe der CULTURA SUISSE im Januar 2020 trafen sich 140 Aussteller und über 3‘000 Fachbesucher.
  • Der Veranstaltungsort befindet sich im Her- zen der Schweiz in Bern. Damit ist mit der Nä- he zur Sprachgrenze auch die Voraussetzung für nationale Kontakte in alle Sprachregionen gegeben.
  • Neben Austeller-Angeboten mit Produktepräsentationen, Vorführungen, Dienstleistungen und Informationen bietet die CULTURA SUISSE auch Foren und Kongresse parallel zur Ausstellung.

Das Ziel der CULTURA SUISSE ist es, einen vom Schweizer Markt aus getragenen, länderübergreifenden Austausch mit Wissenstransfer und Networking aufzubauen.


Die CULTURA SUISSE bietet dabei den anwesenden Unternehmen eine einzigartige Plattform um ihre Produkte in
einem effektiven Markt und Rahmen zu präsentieren.
Durch parallel laufende Kongresse und einem interessanten Fachprogramm, wird auch das Bedürfnis nach Informationen zu neusten Entwicklungen, nach Erfahrungsberichten und nach Weiterbildung abgedeckt.

 

Als SKR-Mitglied erhalten Sie freien Eintritt an allen Messetagen (anstatt CHF 25.-- pro Tag)!

> Zum Online Ticketverkauf

Weitere Informationen unter: https://www.cultura-suisse.ch/

mercredi, 06. avril 2022 until vendredi, 08. avril 2022
BERNEXPO, HALLE 1.2

Nicht-invasiv dank digitaler Techniken. Neue Perspektiven in der Erforschung und Restaurierung von Wandmalerei

Congrès et conférences Abeggstiftung Riggisberg You have joined the waiting list for this event
Réservé: 0 | Free Seats: 0

Save the date Nicht-invasiv dank digitaler Techniken. Neue Perspektiven in der Erforschung und Restaurierung von Wandmalerei Internationale Tagung der HAWK (Fakultät Bauen und Erhalten und Hornemann Institut) in Kooperation mit dem Brandenburgischen Landesamt für Denkmalpflege und Archäologisches Landesmuseum sowie dem Domstift Brandenburg

mercredi, 27. avril 2022 until samedi, 30. avril 2022 10:00 - 17:00
Brandenburg a. d. H., Rathaus

Interdisziplinäre Tagung 2022: 850 Jahre St. Godehard in Hildesheim

Congrès et conférences Externe Veranstaltung
Réservé: 0 | Free Seats: 200

Anlässlich des 1000jährigen Jubiläums des Amtsantritts von Bischof Godehard (1022-1038) plant das Bistum Hildesheim ein Festjahr, das auch über die Bistumsgrenzen hinausstrahlen soll. Das Hornemann Institut der HAWK in Hildesheim nimmt diesen Jahrestag zum Anlass, in Kooperation mit dem Bistum u. a. eine interdisziplinäre Tagung über die ehemalige Benediktiner-Klosterkirche St. Godehard zu veranstalten, die 2022 ihr 850jähriges Weihejubiläum feiert. Nähere Informationen auf der Website des Hornemann Instituts: https://www.hornemann-institut.de/german/st_godehard_projekt.php Ansprechpartnerin: Dr. A. Weyser

lundi, 19. septembre 2022 until mercredi, 21. septembre 2022 14:00 - 17:00
HAWK Hochschule für angewandte Wissenschaft und Kunst Hildesheim/Holzminden/Göttingen